Skip to content

Fine Timepieces

Fine Timepieces

Fine watches are sophisticated and precise pieces of equipment; with the price often reflecting the skilled workmanship that goes into the timepiece. To enjoy your watch for years to come, follow these simple care and cleaning guidelines.

Only a Reis-Nichols expert jeweler/watchmaker should be trusted to put your watch back into working condition. With hundreds of tiny moving parts inside a watch you should never open the back, even to simply change the battery.

Give your watch a quick check on a regular basis, making sure that the strap or bracelet is securely attached to the watch face.

A mechanical watch should be checked regularly by our certified watchmaker and serviced according to the manufacturer's guidelines.

Replace broken or scratched crystals immediately. Even the smallest crack or chip can let dust and moisture into the timekeeping mechanism, threatening its accuracy.

Know what the degree of water-resistance is when you purchase your watch and be careful not wear it into the shower or pool, unless it is safe to do so.

Have our watchmaker replace the battery in a quartz watch before it runs out. Dead batteries left in the watch can leak or corrode, ruining the timepiece. If you watch is water-resistant, a special test must be performed after the battery has been replaced to ensure that water will not leak into and damage the watch.

The average life expectance of batteries in a fine Swiss timepiece is about two to three years.

Oils from your skin can build up on a watch. If your watch is water-resistant, you can give it a quick cleaning with a mixture of warm water and either a mild soap or a dish detergent. Dry the watch with a soft cloth after cleaning. If your watch has a strap made out of leather or another material, you should clean only the watch face and not the strap.

If your watch is not water-resistant, or you're not sure, do not immerse it in water. Clean the piece with a slightly damp cloth and then dry.